Median Income (by Sex)

Definition:

Median income, by sex.

Methods and Limitations:

The data source for this indicator is the final version of the T1 Family File, created by the Centre for Income and Socio-Economic Well-being Statistics of Statistics Canada. Because they are based on a different methodology, estimates of the number of individuals and census families presented in this table differ from estimates produced by the Centre for Demography. Information on the data source, the historical availability, definitions of the terms used, and the geographies available can be found at Technical Reference Guide for the Annual Income Estimates for Census Families, Individuals and Seniors – opens in a new browser window.

Total income is income from all sources. A detailed definition of what is included in total income is available from the Technical Reference Guide for the Annual Income Estimates for Census Families, Individuals and Seniors – opens in a new browser window.

Median is the middle number in a group of numbers. Where a median income, for example, is given as $26,000, it means that exactly half of the incomes reported are greater than or equal to $26,000, and that the other half is less than or equal to the median amount. Starting in 2007, median incomes in the data tables are rounded to the nearest ten dollars (prior to 2007 they were rounded to the nearest hundred dollars). Zero values are not included in the calculation of medians for individuals.

As of 2020, COVID benefits are included in income estimates.

Tax filers are people who filed a tax return for the reference year and were alive at the end of the year.

Source(s):

Statistics Canada. Table 11-10-0008-01  Tax filers and dependants with income by total income, sex and age

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Median Income (by Sex) in the Sustainable Development Goals

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1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Extreme poverty rates have been cut by more than half since 1990. While this is a remarkable achievement, one in five people in developing regions still live on less than $1.90 a day, and there are millions more who make little more than this daily amount, plus many people risk slipping back into poverty.

Poverty is more than the lack of income and resources to ensure a sustainable livelihood. Its manifestations include hunger and malnutrition, limited access to education and other basic services, social discrimination and exclusion as well as the lack of participation in decision-making. Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality.