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Undergraduate Tuition Fees

Definition:

Weighted average undergraduate tuition fees for domestic students (in current dollars)

Methods and Limitations:

If two or more institutions are located within the same census metropolitan area (CMA) or census agglomeration (CA), the tuition fees were combined to calculate the weighted average.

The national and provincial tuition fee averages are weighted with the latest enrolment data (2017/2018 Postsecondary Student Information System). If the number of enrolments is unknown for a given program, that program is excluded from the averages. The same enrolment data are used for the weighting of both years, 2019/2020 and 2020/2021, thereby permitting the comparison of changes in the tuition fees only.

As the distribution of enrolment varies from period to period, caution must be exercised when making long-term historical comparison.

The fields of study are adapted from the 2016 Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP), Statistics Canada’s standard for the classification of instructional programs.

It is important to note that tuition fee increases are generally regulated by provincial policies. However, some programs may be exempted from these policies resulting in possible increases that exceed provincial limits.

Data in this release do not take into account financial assistance or tax rebates provided to students.

Data for 2020/2021 are preliminary

Source(s): Statistics Canada. Table 37-10-0120-01  Undergraduate tuition fees, Canadian students, by selected standard geographic areas and by field of study

 
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Undergraduate Tuition Fees in the Sustainable Development Goals

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4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning
4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

Obtaining a quality education is the foundation to improving people’s lives and sustainable development. Major progress has been made towards increasing access to education at all levels and increasing enrolment rates in schools particularly for women and girls. Basic literacy skills have improved tremendously, yet bolder efforts are needed to make even greater strides for achieving universal education goals. For example, the world has achieved equality in primary education between girls and boys, but few countries have achieved that target at all levels of education.

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

Roughly half the world’s population still lives on the equivalent of about US$2 a day. And in too many places, having a job doesn’t guarantee the ability to escape from poverty. This slow and uneven progress requires us to rethink and retool our economic and social policies aimed at eradicating poverty.

A continued lack of decent work opportunities, insufficient investments and under-consumption lead to an erosion of the basic social contract underlying democratic societies: that all must share in progress. The creation of quality jobs will remain a major challenge for almost all economies well beyond 2015.

Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs that stimulate the economy while not harming the environment. Job opportunities and decent working conditions are also required for the whole working age population.