Description
Graphs
SDGs

Post-secondary Attainment

Definition:

Percent of population aged 15 years and over who have a university degree or a post-secondary certificate or diploma.

Methods and Limitations:

Highest certificate, diploma or degree is the classification used in the census to measure the broader concept of ‘Educational attainment.’

This variable refers to the highest level of education that a person has successfully completed and is derived from the educational qualifications questions, which asked for all certificates, diplomas and degrees to be reported.

The general hierarchy used in deriving this variable (high school, trades, college, university) is loosely tied to the ‘in-class’ duration of the various types of education. At the detailed level, someone who has completed one type of certificate, diploma or degree will not necessarily have completed the credentials listed below it in the hierarchy. For example, a person with an apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma may not have completed a high school certificate or diploma, nor does an individual with a ‘master’s degree’ necessarily have a ‘certificate or diploma above bachelor level.’ Although the hierarchy may not fit all programs perfectly, it gives a general measure of educational attainment.

This variable is reported for persons aged 15 years and over in private households.

Source(s):

Statistics Canada. Table 14-10-0118-01  Labour force characteristics by educational degree, annual

 
Loading

Post-secondary Attainment in the Sustainable Development Goals

Click on the SDG to reveal more information

4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning
4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

4. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning

Obtaining a quality education is the foundation to improving people’s lives and sustainable development. Major progress has been made towards increasing access to education at all levels and increasing enrolment rates in schools particularly for women and girls. Basic literacy skills have improved tremendously, yet bolder efforts are needed to make even greater strides for achieving universal education goals. For example, the world has achieved equality in primary education between girls and boys, but few countries have achieved that target at all levels of education.