Description
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SDGs

Obesity Rate

Definition:

Obesity Rates (Percent) of the Population 18 and over – self reported body mass index (BMI)

Methods and Limitations:

Body mass index (BMI) is calculated by dividing the respondent’s body weight (in kilograms) by their height (in metres) squared.

Body mass index (BMI) is a method of classifying body weight according to health risk. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, health risk levels are associated with each of the following BMI categories: normal weight = least health risk; underweight and overweight = increased health risk; obese, class I = high health risk; obese, class II = very high health risk; obese, class III = extremely high health risk.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, the index for body weight classification for the population aged 18 and older is: less than 18.50 (underweight); 18.50 to 24.99 (normal weight); 25.00 to 29.99 (overweight); 30.00 to 34.99 (obese, class I); 35.00 to 39.99 (obese, class II); 40.00 or greater (obese, class III). The population aged 12 to 17 is classified as “severely obese”, “obese”, or “overweight” according to age and sex specific cut-off points defined by the World Health Organization.

A systematic review of the literature concluded that the use of self-reported data among adults underestimates weight and overestimates height, resulting in lower estimates of obesity than those obtained from measured data. Using data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) subsample, where both measured and self-reported height and weight were collected, BMI correction equations have been developed. This table presents obesity estimates adjusted using these equations.

The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) – Annual, the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and the 2015 CCHS – Nutrition, all collect height and weight data and derive obesity rates based on Body Mass Index (BMI). Users should take note of the data collection method, the target population and the classification system used by each survey in order to select the appropriate data set.

Source (s)

Statistics Canada. Table 13-10-0113-01  Health characteristics, two-year period estimates

 
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Obesity Rate in the Sustainable Development Goals

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2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

It is time to rethink how we grow, share and consume our food.

If done right, agriculture, forestry and fisheries can provide nutritious food for all and generate decent incomes, while supporting people-centred rural development and protecting the environment.

Right now, our soils, freshwater, oceans, forests and biodiversity are being rapidly degraded. Climate change is putting even more pressure on the resources we depend on, increasing risks associated with disasters such as droughts and floods. Many rural women and men can no longer make ends meet on their land, forcing them to migrate to cities in search of opportunities.

A profound change of the global food and agriculture system is needed if we are to nourish today’s 815 million hungry and the additional 2 billion people expected by 2050.

The food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for development, and is central for hunger and poverty eradication.

Related Obesity Rate Targets

2.2

By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons